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Children’s Sleep On Bedtime Live

By sleepcounciladmin on March 21, 2013

Children’s Sleep On Bedtime Live  So who watched Channel 4’s Bedtime Live this week?

I watched it with avid interest – as someone who is involved in sleep but is also a parent of two young children.

I was particularly horrified with the 14 year old twin boys – Callum and Lewis – who only got three to six hours of sleep a night because they were addicted to gaming.  And wasn’t it interesting to see how their memory and learning increased so significantly following a better bedtime routine, and a more deep, restful sleep?

There has been lots of research about how technology is impacting on sleep quality (and not just for children).  The growth of computers, TVs, video games, social media, texting means we aren’t switching off properly before bed. Not only do they prevent you from falling asleep, but they may become disruptive at inopportune times and wake you back up. Also exposure to even the weakest glow at night – for example, your TV’s standby button or your mobile phone notification light – can unconsciously play havoc with your body’s circadian rhythms.

During the programme, there was a live poll which showed that 41% of parents felt their child/children didn’t get enough sleep – a sizeable number and one that does need to be addressed. Getting enough sleep allows children to react more quickly to situations, have a more developed memory, learn more effectively and solve problems.

Children don’t always understand the importance of sleep which is why it is particularly important for parents to a) know how much sleep their child should get and b) enforce an appropriate bedtime routine.

As a general rule of thumb:

– Toddlers need around 12 hours of sleep a night

– Children aged four to six – 10.5-11.5 hours

– Six-12 years olds – 10 hours

– Teenagers – around eight to nine hours.

For a copy of our Good-Night Guide for Children call 0800 018 7923 or download here. For teenager sleeping tips, read here.

The series runs for another five weeks, so do tune in – I know I will.

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4 thoughts on “Children’s Sleep On Bedtime Live

  1. I didn’t see this program, but will look it up – thanks for the reminder. I just left a comment on another article of yours about a similar topic. I guess this is becoming quite an issue, and rightly it should. At least the media is making attempts to educate people about the need for sleep. I wonder how many people were in bed though watching the TV program about how gaming etc can disrupt sleep!

    1. Thanks for your comments, Ethan. It is great that the media is getting behind sleep education. It does need to be addressed. And as for, watching the TV programme while in bed – yes I bet that was a fair few of them! All the best, Lisa

  2. Have really enjoyed watching this programme. As a Mother of 4 grown up children, I relived many of my children’s bedtime routines…especially the ‘rapid return’ technique. With patience and love this really works eventually. I am also a registered children’s nurse and work on a general healthcare and sleep advice line. As a licensed facilitator to deliver parenting programmes, I use these various sleep routine techniques to help parents with behaviour management. Sleep education is vital for parents and their children. Sticking with these routines really do work and reaping the rewards of undisturbed sleep are truly priceless.

  3. Thanks for the post!!! My son is almost 22 months old and we have had some success with sleep training. He goes into his cot awake after bath, milk and story and settles himself.

    Our problem is early waking, he wakes anytime from 7.00, crying and unable to settle back to sleep. He won’t go back to sleep if we go in and ssh him. I normally bring him into bed with me to try and doze a little, 7 times out of 11 he will have a breastfeed and stay awake, then need an early nap because he’s so tired. Any suggestions for getting him to 7.00 or even later? Thanks again!

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