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HOP TO BED THIS EASTER

By Lisa Artis on April 3, 2017

sc-logo-smilies-easter-lo-resUse the Easter break (16 April) to focus on a better night’s sleep – that’s the advice from The Sleep Council.

“As the depths of winter seem like a distant memory and our evenings become lighter and longer, naturally, our sleeping patterns tend to change,” said Lisa Artis at The Sleep Council.

“The clocks have already gone forward (20 March) and so the long Easter weekend is a perfect time to catch up on some Zzzz’s and get back into a healthy sleeping routine, ready to feel refreshed and energised for the summer months ahead.

“Many people see spring as a fresh start for their diets and getting fitter, yet many people don’t realise that sleep fulfils a vital role in keeping us healthy and happy too, much like proper nutrition and exercise!”

The Sleep Council says poor sleep and fatigue are common problems affecting millions of people. Just one bad night’s sleep can influence our mood, concentration and alertness.

Continued Lisa: “Long-term sleep deprivation has far more serious consequences and has been linked to heart disease, diabetes and stroke. So this Easter, we’re urging people to assess their sleep and ensure quality snoozing is also on the agenda!”

If you’re struggling to get a good night’s sleep, try following The Sleep Council’s Easter sleeping tips:

1.    Do you have the right bed? Having the correct bed for you is the foundation of a quality night’s sleep. Research shows that sleeping on an uncomfortable bed could deprive you of up to an hour’s sleep a night. The Sleep Council advise replacing your bed after around seven years.

2.    Create the ideal sleep environment: A calm and relaxing bedroom is key to a good night’s sleep. Keeping your bedroom quiet, cool and dark will help create the ideal environment.

3.    Turn off electronics: TVs, smart phones, laptops, radios and games consoles all have a significant impact on our sleeping habits. Using a gadget just before bed makes it harder to switch off mentally and wind down. Even exposure to the weakest glow of blue, electronic light – such as a notification flashing up on your mobile phone – can unconsciously play havoc with your body’s circadian rhythms, keeping you alert when you should be sleepy.

4.    Keep a routine: Our bodies love routine when it comes to sleep, so make sure you don’t neglect it. Going to bed and getting up at roughly the same every day helps to programme the body to sleep better.

5.    And breathe… Bedtime is your time to switch off – or it should be. Meditation is a great tool to help calm our minds down and relax our bodies. You could also try having a warm bath before bed, listening to quiet music, deep breathing or yoga. If you’re the sort of person who starts to worry when you get into bed, or makes ‘to do’ lists in your head, try writing down the things you need to tackle – you can deal with those in the morning after a good night’s sleep!

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