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The Rise Of The Snoring Room

By sleepcounciladmin on September 9, 2015

The Rise Of The Snoring Room  If you’ve ever been woken by your partner’s deafening snoring tones or struggled to slink into slumber because of the noise coming from your bedside partner, then you’re not alone!

Snoring is one of the most common partner disturbances when it comes to sleep and what starts off as a niggle can soon become very annoying especially when you’re trying your best to get off to the land of nod.

So I did have a little chuckle to myself as I read the latest newspaper article about the rise of the snoring room – basically a separate bedroom to banish your snoring partner to!

Apparently the latest survey shows that homes for the wealthy now come with his and her bedrooms, inspired by a range of factors including the issue of snoring, as it cites one in six couples now sleep separately.

The subject of whether couples still sleep together or not rears its head quite often and it’s not that unusual. Over recent years there’s been lots of research into how many couples now sleep apart and how beneficial – or not beneficial – it is for your sleep.  And there is a large number of us who do sleep in separate bedrooms – for many reasons whether that’s snoring, health or just personal space.

Our Great British Bedtime Report found that 31% of women and 19% of men are disturbed by snoring with many saying that they think their sleep would improve if their partner didn’t snore. Yet in the same research, 78% did report they shared a bed. 

For those who do enjoy sleeping with their partner, regardless of snoring, a bigger bed could be the answer. Did you know that only around 30% of us buy a king or super king size bed?

However disrupted sleep can leave many couples short tempered with each other leading to rows and squabbles. So if snoring is a real issue then a snoring room (or what us mere folk call a separate bedroom) is no bad thing!

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